GUIDELINES FOR A SUCCESSFUL HOME INSPECTION

What does a home inspection include?
The standard home inspector’s report will cover the condition of the home’s heating system; central air conditioning system (temperature permitting); interior plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation, basement and structural components.

If you already are a homeowner, a home inspection can identify problems in the making and suggest preventive measures that might help you avoid costly future repairs.

If you are planning to sell your home, a home inspection can give you the opportunity to make repairs that will put the house in better selling condition.

What will it cost?
Do not let cost be a factor in deciding whether or not to have a home inspection or in the selection of your home inspector. Use the inspector’s qualifications, including experience, training and compliance with your state’s regulations, if any, and professional affiliations as a guide.

Can a house fail a home inspection?
No. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of a house. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value and it is not a municipal inspection, which verifies local code compliance. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its physical condition and indicate what components and systems may need major repair or replacement.

How do I find a home inspector?
You can ask friends or acquaintances to recommend a home inspector they have used. Or, you can go to www.ashi.org or www.ahsiww.com and use the Find An Inspector search tool for a list of home inspectors in your area who belong to the non-profit professional organization. Also, real estate agents and brokers are familiar with the service and may be able to provide you with a list of names from which to choose.

What is ASHI?
Since 1976, ASHI has worked to build consumer awareness of home inspection and to enhance the professionalism of its membership. The ASHI Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics serves as a performance guideline for home inspectors, and is universally recognized and accepted by many professional and governmental bodies. The American Society of Home Inspectors has received NCCA accreditation to award the ASHI Certified Inspector credential to those members meeting our highest standard.

Do I have to be there?
While it’s not required that you be present for the inspection, it is highly recommended. You will be able to observe the inspector and ask questions as you learn about the condition of the home and how to maintain it. If you are not able to attend the inspection then request your inspector call you for a verbal synopsis of the condition of the home and to be able to answer some questions about these conditions should you need further clarification.
      

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